Facebook

16 May 2018

Wordless Wednesday | Plywood Boat Bound For Haiti



Wordless Wednesday is supposed to be about posting a photo(s) without any words. But, I'm a rule breaker, so here are a few words:

1 - There's a Haitian guy building a boat out of plywood and PVC pipe near Indiantown. We went out and had a look around and chatted with him. Nice guy. Why he's making it in Indiantown, I have no idea.

2 - He told us that he's going to take it to Haiti where it will be used for tours for cruise ship passengers. I imagine it will look a bit different once they finish building it and paint it.

3 - I'm always surprised that boats float (including my own). I know the science behind it, but when you look at a boat on land you just can't help but think that it's going to sink once you splash it into the water.

4 - Would you ride on a boat made out of plywood and PVC pipe?

What words does this picture(s) bring to your mind when you look at it?

For more Wordless Wednesday fun, click here

Thanks for stopping by our blog - we love it when people come visit! We're also on Facebook - pop by and say hi!

Murder at the Marina available for pre-order at:

Amazon (US)
Amazon (CA)
Amazon (UK)
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Apple iBooks
Google Play

33 comments:

  1. What are they normally made of?
    It's like watching a house being built. It doesn't look that sturdy and secure in the building stage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sturdier, more sustainable wood, fiberglass, ferro-cement (rare), steel or aluminum. Ours (and most boats these days) was made out of fiberglass.

      Delete
    2. I always thought the idea of ferro boats was just plain weird. How in the world do they stay afloat?

      Delete
  2. I'm not thinking I would care to be on this vessel when it's done. I'd rather have some fiberglass. Just saying.

    Have a fabulous Wordless Wednesday, Ellen. ♥

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes! I'd sail on it. Consider that people have been building fiberglass boats for less than a hundred years, whereas they have been building wooden boats for over 5000 years. PVC pipe boats, on the other hand, are probably a fair new thing like PVC pipe lawn furniture, I imagine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Or solar panel arches - I hear some people make them out of PVC too :-)

      Delete
  4. I bet it'll be a pretty cool looking boat once it's done. Probably great for the tours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd love to see it when it's all finished and painted.

      Delete
  5. That's ambitious to make a big boat like that.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Plywood and PVC sounds light enough to float, until the wood gets water-logged. Of course, i am sure he will paint it to prevent that. it sounds very ambitious and i hope it works out well for him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are putting stuff on the plywood to prevent water from getting on.

      Delete
  7. I'm surprised at how good it looks. I think of plywood as a thin flimsy sheet but that looks pretty substantial. You have to give him kudos for building a boat out of scratch -- although I'd let others sail on it for a month before I'd have the guts to get on
    Mary (cactus haiku)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Letting someone else try it out first seems like a sensible plan :-)

      Delete
  8. I'd get in as long as it was able to swim for shore. Safety first. hehehe

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As long as there weren't any sharks in the water, that sounds like a good plan :-)

      Delete
  9. I’m sure it will end up being more substantial than it looks now, so yes - probably!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Me ride in a boat made of plywood that far? Nope. Haha! I'd be skeptical even stepping one foot on it...I can't swim. :O

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We'd definitely get you a life jacket to wear :-)

      Delete
  11. Yes, I'd totally get on that boat. (But I'd wear a life jacket.) I bet it's going to turn out beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I don't think I would ride a boat made of plywood. One bad storm and that boat would be totaled!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe, maybe not...but I wouldn't want to be the one on it testing to see if it safe.

      Delete
  13. I’m not so sure about this one... I’d be curious to find out whether it actually floats and is able to sustain anything. Is he thinking of sailing it all the way to Haiti, or transporting it on another ship? Then again, I’ve used many rickety forms of transportation all over the world, so, once in Haiti, I might step foot on this one. As long as there are enough life jackets. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The guy said it is the same design that another (or more than one) Haitian boats have been built from, so I guess it's a proven design? I'm curious too how it's going to get to Haiti.

      Delete
  14. That think looks crazy, like it's not even a boat. Sorry to say I prefer solid ground. ~shakes head~ But please please please let me get to the beach this fall. ~grin~ Be well!

    ReplyDelete
  15. It looks interesting, and like it might be a decent boat when done. But plywood does have its issues and I would probably research its probable viability before I got on board!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It kind of makes you wonder about other boats you get on - they look great, but what's underneath?

      Delete

We LOVE when people leave comments. It's so much more fun hearing what you have to say. If you have a blog, make sure you leave a link and I'll be sure to pop on by.