Facebook

19 April 2016

P Is For Plane | Nancy Drew Investigates {A To Z Challenge}


During April, we're participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge. Every day (except Sundays), we'll be doing an alphabet themed post starting with "A is for Anchor" and ending with "Z is for Zodiac." Each post is an installment of "Nancy Drew Investigates the Case of the Missing Anchor" - so you may want to read the posts from the beginning, in order to follow along with the story (click here for the first post and here for an index of all the posts). At the end of each post, you'll also find some random thoughts on the day's particular topic. So, if Nancy isn't your thing, feel free to skip the story and go straight to the end.    

****

When we last left you, the girls ran into Captain Gus on their way to the jetty. Nancy questioned him about his nephew Pete and the items that were stolen from the marina.

****

“Girls, we’re going to stop by Spider Sapphire first and try some of the rum they got when they were in the Caribbean,” said Shelley. “We’ll go with them in their dinghy and then they’ll give us lift back to our boat. Why don’t you go ahead and take our dinghy back to our boat. You could probably do with a quiet night on the boat after all the excitement of the race today.”

Shelley and Marvin waved as they headed off across the anchorage.

“Darn it, I forgot to bring a flashlight. Do either of you happen to have one? It’s pretty dark out here and I can barely see the dinghy,” said Nancy as she made her way carefully down the jetty.

“Sorry, neither of us has one,” said George. “Here, I’ve got the painter. I’ll untie it while you two get in.”
A few minutes later, Nancy started the outboard engine and pointed them towards where The Scarlet Slipper was moored. Because there were only three of them in the dinghy, they were able to get it to plane and skim over the water quickly.

When they were a few feet away from the boat, the engine started making spluttering noises and then stopped running. Nancy tried restarting the engine repeatedly with no success. “Quick, grab the oars and starting rowing us towards the boat. This current is taking us out into the bay!”

Bess and George looked around but the oars were nowhere to be found. Bess shrieked, “We don’t have any oars? We’re going to drift out into the bay and be lost at sea forever!” As Bess started to sob, George asked Nancy, “Do you think we’re out of gas?”

“We shouldn’t be. Marvin topped up the tank before we left the boat this evening.” Nancy had a closer look at the outboard engine. “I really wish we had a flashlight, it’s so hard to see anything. Wait a minute - I think you’re right George. We’re out of gas! Somebody must have siphoned most of it out of the tank. We were lucky to have made it this far.”

“Who would do such a thing?” asked Bess.

“I don’t know. We’ll figure that out later. Right now, hand me that extra gas tank so I can get us going again. Fortunately, they must not have seen it tucked in the back of the dinghy.” said Nancy.

While Nancy disconnected the old tank and attached the new one, Bess looked nervously at the bay they were drifting into. “I bet it was that Captain Gus fellow. He sure looked dodgy to me. He tried to kill us by stealing our oars and making sure we ran out of gas. It was sabotage!”

Tune in on Wednesday for the next installment of Nancy Drew Investigates – Q is for Q Flag.

****

The dinghy dock at Green Turtle Cay in the Bahamas. Which of these dinghies can plane? The dinghy on the far left is a Zodiac, which will be the topic of our Z post.

Some of you are probably confused. You saw "plane" in the title and you were expecting a proper airplane to make an appearance in the story. Sorry to disappoint, but "plane" in this case refers to making your dinghy whizz across the water. I guess it's kind of like an airplane in a way, flying across the water, but without the helpful flight attendants passing out headphones and charging you $5 for the pleasure.

Here's the bad thing about writing this Nancy Drew story. I've dreamed up new things to be worried about. It never occurred to me that someone might sabotage our dinghy, stealing the oars and gasoline, but now it's a worry. And, it's my own fault, because I came up with it for this story. No one else to blame for my paranoia but me. Sad, really.

We don't have to worry so much about our dinghy at night as we raise it up out of the water on davits, making it harder for bad people to get to it. When we take it to a dinghy dock, we lock it up. But, we can't really lock our oars or our gas tank, so they're fair game. I think the secret to avoiding sabotage is not to stick my nose into other people's business. Nancy just can't help herself.

What are your secret fears? Of course, by telling us about them in the comments, they won't really be secret anymore, but it will be quite cathartic. Does anyone else think that "cathartic" isn't a very pleasant sounding word? Go on, try saying it out loud a number of times. 

Thanks for stopping by our blog - we love it when people come visit! We're also on Facebook - we'd love for you to pop by and say hi!  










27 comments:

  1. That was low - someone is getting serious. I have several secret fears - but mostly they're my over active imagination that only comes out in the dark :). I saw this really scary short horror film called Lights Out (I believe they've made it into a feature now) and I have been known to run back to run back to bed in the middle of the night after visiting the bathroom :).
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's why I don't watch horror movies - they make me too scared to fall asleep :-)

      Delete
  2. I agree. Cathartic makes me think of clogged arteries. But, maybe that's what we're doing when we write out our fears, unclogging the angst arteries. Keeping a low profile and being smart about locking up your things helps prevent theft, but nothing is fool proof. My fears aren't secret, pretty normal, in fact. I worry about being attacked when I go to the cities for shows, especially in those creepy parking ramps!
    Great installment of N.D.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a brilliant way of thinking about it - unclogging the angst arteries! Parking garages are pretty creepy late at night with all of the sounds of loud footsteps which you start to think are an axe murderer coming to get you, but instead turn out to be from a granny with a walker.

      Delete
  3. They say most of the things we fear never happen...but it's hard to make our brains believe that!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's true, bad things rarely happen, but our imagination has a way of running away with itself.

      Delete
  4. Do Marvin and Shelley have other plans? Or did they just need a break from the crying, questions, and constant cooking?
    Cathartic sounds too much like catheter. I have a fear of our outboard being stolen; we do have a lock, but supposedly these Yamaha 15s are popular to steal. Now I can worry about fuel being siphoned out too! Cool!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're out of booze and valium (the only way they can cope with Bess) and are actually off to try to score some more from other boats in the anchorage.

      I feel like I've done my job if you've added a new fear to your list :-)

      Delete
  5. Stealing gasoline from truckers is unfortunately very common and I've heard about many, that's the main reason they usually stop only on secured and well monitored lots (often for a fee). I have a fear of unknown...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trucks carry so much gas, that that would be a huge amount of money we're talking about. I can see why they only stop someplace safe.

      Delete
  6. Nothing like creating some new worries for yourself.
    My greatest worry is losing my wife as I'd be lost without her.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aww...that is so sweet! I'm sure she feels the same way about you too.

      Delete
  7. When we're camping in the desert, I'm afraid the march of the tarantulas is going to come by and grab me in the middle of the night and carry me away . . . it could happen!

    Cheers,
    Stephanie

    http://www.svcambria.com/2016/04/p-is-for-provisioning.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tarantualas are so creepy looking. We ran into our fair share of them on our camping trip our west.

      Delete
  8. I suspect secret fears are secret for a very good reason. I fear people finding out what my fears are!!!

    @Kathleen01930
    Meet My Imaginary Friends
    #AtoZchallenge

    ReplyDelete
  9. We had a rash of thieves stealing gasoline from boats at the marinas. It was awful. Fuel is not cheap on the water.

    Loving this story.

    Have a fabulous day Ellen. ☺

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's just awful. Boats carry a lot of fuel too, so that would be a huge expense to find your tank had been drained.

      Delete
  10. That Bess. She has an overly active Amy. G. Dala. Good think Nancy already knows all about how to connect that new gas tank to the outboard. Just something else I still have to learn. So much learning. My brain is full already!Melissa from
    LittleCunningPlan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If Amy G Dala had a human form, it would be Bess. Scott has changed the gas tanks, but I didn't pay attention at the time. I really should have.

      Delete
  11. I'm secretly afraid that this will always be my life. This place of almost.
    https://ryanscarty.wordpress.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that is probably a secret fear that many of us have - this place of almost.

      Delete
  12. Planing in your dinghy is such an amazing feeling (when the seas are flat). When we had our dogs and an old dinghy, we always had to drive slowly, but later on during our cruising years, we had to buck up and buy a new dinghy. Luckily, the by then old 8HP engine, still managed to get us on a plane.

    Paddling a dinghy with flipflops is a (slow) possibility. Or once, I had to swim with it, holding the painter to make any progress...

    Better not to fear anything while cruising and dive head first into whatever has to happen, without too much thought. Easier said than done, I know. :-)

    Liesbet @ Roaming About – A Life Less Ordinary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did you really paddle a dinghy with flipflops? I think it would almost be easier to swim with it.

      Delete
    2. It is easier to swim with it! But, when the water is too gross or cold and your ride does not have oars (that would never happen in our own dinghy... :-)), flipflops might be the only alternative to a stalled engine.

      Delete
  13. That Nancy - she is certainly a can do gal. Does she have a cell phone with a flashlight?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No she doesn't have a cell phone. I got kind of muddled up when I wrote this story. Part of me was envisioning Nancy back in the time period that the books were set in when I read them, but then I ended up including things from present day in the story. But, having cell phones seemed like a step too far.

      Delete

We'd LOVE to hear from you! If we're out on the water cruising, our internet access will be limited and it may take a while before we're able to respond to your comments and pay a return visit to your blog, but please know that we will once we can get connected.